Cook candidate Gaye Cameron calls for special mental health center in area | St George & Sutherland Shire Leader

breaking news, Gaye Cameron, mental health, dedicated mental health center, Cook, Pauline Hanson’s One Nation

Many residents of Sutherland Shire and St George who require long-term mental health treatment are sent to institutions in other parts of Sydney, says Gaye Cameron, Pauline Hanson’s One Nation candidate in Cook. Ms Cameron, a mental health counselor and social worker, said a purpose-built center should be established in the south of Sydney for patients and families trying to support them. If elected, she would fight for funding, Cameron said. Ms Cameron said she has spoken to many residents since the start of her campaign in January this year who have shed tears and expressed anger and disappointment at how they have been abandoned. “While we have dedicated mental health wards in our two public hospitals serving voters, there are still many residents with long-term mental health who need to seek help elsewhere in the Sydney Basin,” she said. “I spoke to a mother in early February, who was heartbroken. “Her daughter was in a mental health facility on the North Coast and because of vaccine mandates, she had been unable to see her daughter for more than 12 months. “First, how distressing to the mother that her daughter is on the North Coast, and second, that her maternal rights are being taken away from seeing her own daughter.” “Much more can be done for society to ease the added tensions. Job security, end the mandates, provide greater access to Medicare support, including adding registered counselors to the Medicare discount, would be a start,” Ms Cameron said in the past several years, particularly during and right after COVID, she had seen a dramatic increase in the number of people presenting with mental health problems.” According to the Australian Federal Department of Health, nearly half of all Australian adults will die during their lifetime,” she said. “Suicide was the leading cause of death for Australians aged 15 to 49 in 2019. “During COVID and more recently, I have seen an increase in clients seeking help and support for their mental health issues, with more than 40 percent of clients experiencing mental illness as a result of lockdowns, vaccine mandates leading to job losses and others, and direct strain on relationships.”

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Many residents of Sutherland Shire and St George who require long-term mental health treatment are sent to institutions in other parts of Sydney, says Gaye Cameron, Pauline Hanson’s One Nation candidate in Cook.

Ms Cameron, a mental health counselor and social worker, said a purpose-built center should be established in the south of Sydney for patients and families trying to support them.

If elected, she would fight for funding, Cameron said.

Ms Cameron said she has spoken to many residents since the start of her campaign in January this year who have shed tears and expressed anger and disappointment at how they have been abandoned.

“While we have dedicated mental health wards in our two public hospitals serving voters, there are still many residents with long-term mental health who need to seek help elsewhere in the Sydney Basin,” she said.

“I spoke to a mother in early February, who was heartbroken.

“Her daughter was in a mental health facility on the North Coast and due to vaccine mandates, she had not been able to see her daughter for over 12 months.

“First, how distressing to the mother that her daughter is on the North Coast, and second, that her maternal rights are being taken away from seeing her own daughter.”

“Much more can be done for society to alleviate the added stress.

“Job security, end the mandates, more access to Medicare support, including registered counselors added to the Medicare discount, would be a start.”

Ms Cameron said she had seen a dramatic increase in the number of people with mental health problems in recent years, particularly during and just after COVID.

“According to the Australian Federal Ministry of Health, nearly half of all Australian adults will experience mental health problems during their lifetime,” she said.

Suicide was the leading cause of death for Australians aged 15 to 49 in 2019.

“During COVID and more recently, I have seen an increase in clients seeking help and support for their mental health issues, with more than 40 percent of clients experiencing mental health issues as a result of lockdowns, vaccine mandates resulting in job losses and others, and direct pressure on relationships”.

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